The Egg: Germ of a new life.

The Egg: Germ of a new life.

Caterpillar: A time of growth

Chrysalis: A time of change.

HomeMonarch EggCaterpillarChrysalisButterflyCecropia MothCecropia LarvaeCocoonCecropia AdultA Story of SamPolyphemus MothVideosSmall Wonders

The egg, as in many living things, is the vehicle from which new life emerges. Pictures below open a window onto a world of wonder often overlooked as we walk by. Events of the natural world are happening all around us. All we need to do is take a side road off the beaten path of our busy goal-focused life and become aware.

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From "Egg To Caterpillar"

Watch the baby larvae appear within the egg, hatch, and eat the egg shell as its first meal.

 

 

 

To view this shockwave photo presentation click on this photo.

 

 

http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/egg_shows.html

View  indepth "shockwave"  picture presentations showing detail within a complete metamorphosis.  Click on a link below.

Watch as a caterpillar is seen developing within its egg, hatches, and eats the egg shell. http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/egg_shows.html

See a caterpillar preparing for pupation. After a silk anchor is completed the larvae crawls forward midway, turns around, finds and securely attaches its hind claspers. Then the insect proceeds to slowly release and hang head downwards. http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/larva.html

A caterpillar to chrysalis transformation. The larvae sheds its skin to reveal a wet gyrating chrysalis. The pupae must transfer its hold to its cremaster and drop the old larval skin. The chrysalis gradually assumes its predestined shape and hardens into an imobile waxy pupae. http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/pupa.html

Chrysalis emergence as a transformed butterfly is indeed one of the wonders of nature. View a butterfly breaking free of the pupae, expanding and drying its wings. http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/adult_shows.html

 

Pictures and slideshows showing metamorphosis from egg - caterpillar - chrysalis to adult butterfly are found on this site. The photos present detailed images of a complete metamorphosis transformation. Be sure to link to the pages. When a  thumbnail photo is seen click on the left picture to begin a full sized image slideshow. The sequence will include many more photos and will auto advance every ten seconds. Navigation for "forward" "back" and "up" will appear at the bottom of each image allowing you to view at your leisure. Note: Clicking on any thumbnail image will start the slideshow at that point in the presentation.

1. Butterfly laying egg.jpg

It all starts with a mother butterfly finding a young soft healthy milkweed and carefully depositing an egg. Usually monarch females will lay their eggs on the underside of the leaf. Only one egg is laid. This provides protection and an ample food supply.

2. Egg laid.jpg

3. Egg monarch cropped.jpg

If you click on the left photo you will see the intricate design of a monarch butterfly egg. The almost crystalline-like furrowed lattice is barely visible to the naked eye. The egg itself is smaller than a pinhead. Gestation for monarch eggs is between three to five days. If it is warmer they will hatch quicker. The image to the right shows the black color of the larva's head within the egg minutes before hatching.

4. Egg larvae within cropped.jpg

8. Larvae eating egg shell cropped.jpg

Within hours after the black head is apparent at the egg tip (see above) the baby hatches. The newborn immediately turns around and avidly eats the shell. The tiny larva is seen in its first instar period of growth. Images are dated Aug. 19 - 24, 2008

9. Larvae eaten egg shell cropped.jpg

Monarch butterfly egg hunting is a good way to introduce oneself to the world of nature. One easy way in northern Minnesota, where monarchs are very plentiful, is to simply go out on a sunny warm day to a field of milkweed and watch for monarchs flying slowly about fluttering down among young tender milkweed. This is almost a sure sign of egg laying activity. When a female is spotted curling its abdomen underneath a leaf make a mental note of the spot. An egg should have been laid there. As monarchs usually lay on the underside of milkweed leaves it is neccesary to lean the plant over and closely inspect under each leaf. A yellowish conical shaped lightly furrowed egg smaller than a pinhead might be your reward.

Eggs should hatch within three to five days depending on the temperature. Fresh milkweed is a must as this is the only food the caterpillar will eat.  Pictured is a hatchling larva and the egg shell it is just about to eat.

   Next, see the caterpillar grow and become a chrysalis.  >>>

To see more on the topics of "Egg" "Caterpillar" "Chrysalis" or "adult butterfly" lick on the picture or text below.

The Egg: Germ of a new life.

Caterpillar: A time of growth

Chrysalis: A time of change.

HomeMonarch EggCaterpillarChrysalisButterflyCecropia MothCecropia LarvaeCocoonCecropia AdultA Story of SamPolyphemus MothVideosSmall Wonders